Archive for the 'Pigeons and Doves' Category

Peaceful Doves in our garden

Peaceful Doves are a regular visitor in our garden

Peaceful Doves are a regular visitor in our garden

I have written about Peaceful Doves on a number of occasions on this site; check out the articles I have linked to in the ‘Further Reading’ section below. I must admit that I love seeing and hearing this small dove in the Australian bush. They are aptly named and their gentle call is so part of the Australian environment, especially in the drier parts of the country.

Over the 30 plus years, we have lived in our present home, I have recorded this species on quite a few occasions. In the last year or so their visits have become far more regular. In fact, at present, we probably hear or see them on most days of the week. It is still too early to call this a resident species, but it must be close to that. Late last year we are fairly sure that they could also now be added to the list of birds observed breeding on our five-acre block of land. Although we saw them mating, we never found a nest.

More recently – perhaps over the last two months, we have often seen two or three birds come to our bird baths. Then on one occasion we had at least six birds present. I would like to think that this sighting included the successful breeding outcome, and that this little flock is actually one family of birds.

On other occasions, we have only one bird visiting the bird baths for a drink. On one of those occasions I took the bracket of photos shown in today’s post. All of these photos are of the same bird. Although I like this series of shots, the bird in question refused to turn around and face my camera. Some days the birds cooperate, and on other days they just do as they please. That’s the delight – and the frustration – of nature photography.

Further reading:

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

Peaceful Dove

 

 

Eurasian Collared Dove in the Sahara

Eurasian Collared Dove at Merzouga, Morocco

Eurasian Collared Dove at Merzouga, Morocco

On another of my sites (Trevor’s Travels) I have been writing about a tour of Morocco I undertook several years ago. I have, in recent days, finally got around to posting some of the many photos taken on that trip, along with detailed descriptions of what we did and saw. While looking at the photos I found some quite acceptable bird photos.Whenever I could get photos of the local birds, I took them. Identifying them has taken quite a while

Whenever I could get photos of the local birds, I took them. Identifying them has taken quite a while, mainly because I am not very familiar with the birds of Morocco. Over the coming days, I plan to post a few of these photos, along with some information about them.

During our tour, my family and I went on a camel ride into the Sahara Desert. This was at the locality known as Merzouga in the eastern part of the country. I must say that the desert is spectacular; I’ve shared many of the photos on my travel site. We rode the camels into the desert on Christmas Eve, staying in a Berber tent in the desert overnight. It was an unforgettable experience. I saw a few birds on the camels ride, but the moving back of such an animal is far from being an ideal photography platform. In fact, all my bird photos taken on the camel ride were too blurry and unidentifiable. Camel riding is also very uncomfortable! Enough said.

The next morning we rode (with more discomfort) through more spectacular sun dunes, deep red in the early morning sun. We ate a late breakfast at one of the local hotels. It was while having breakfast that I saw several species new to me.

The first one, featured today, was the Eurasian Collared Dove. This lovely dove is found extensively throughout Europe, Asia and has been introduced into North America. It is also found in the northern edges of Africa, including Morocco.

Further reading:

Eurasian Collared Dove at Merzouga, Morocco

Eurasian Collared Dove at Merzouga, Morocco

Eurasian Collared Dove at Merzouga, Morocco

Eurasian Collared Dove at Merzouga, Morocco

Topsy the Crested Pigeon

"Topsy" the Crested Pigeon

“Topsy” the Crested Pigeon

Over recent weeks my wife and I have been intrigued by one of our resident Crested Pigeons – shown in the photos on today’s post. We suspect that she is a female because another pigeon was displaying to her recently. We have given her the name “Topsy” because she has some extra-long feathers making up her crest. I am not sure what has caused this slight aberration, but it certainly makes her stand out from the other pigeons in our garden.

Like all of the Crested Pigeons and Spotted Turtledoves resident in our garden and on our five-acre block, “Topsy” comes frequently to our bird baths for a drink. Today, while I was having a cuppa after lunch she came once again. She spent a few minutes on a nearby branch preening before flying down for a drink. She then flew down to the ground and sat down in the sunshine. She immediately lifted up one wing and held it with the underparts exposed to the warm sun. “Topsy” then stood up, changed position and raised the other wing in the same manner.

While I haven’t seen this sunbathing behaviour in many species I have observed it in Spotted Turtledoves, Red wattlebirds, Noisy Miners and Australian Magpies. It is surprising that there is very little mention of this behaviour in the literature, but this article on the Australian Birdlife site gives the topic a good coverage. The article suggests that this sunbathing behaviour could be aimed at ridding the birds of unwanted lice.

Further reading:

"Topsy" the Crested Pigeon

“Topsy” the Crested Pigeon

"Topsy" the Crested Pigeon

“Topsy” the Crested Pigeon

"Topsy" the Crested Pigeon

“Topsy” the Crested Pigeon

Birds in the heat

New Holland Honeyeaters at our bird bath

New Holland Honeyeaters at our bird bath

Here in South Australia we are experiencing our hottest summer on record. I won’t bore you with the details, but just say that we have had far too many days in the 40s (45C is equal to 113F). During such heatwaves – which can last for several days – our bird population suffers terribly. On these days the resident birds in our garden really appreciate the various bird baths we have placed in suitable locations.

Even on a warm day we get a constant parade of birds visiting the various bird baths in our garden. Our sun room overlooks several of them and this affords me an ideal location to take photos of them. Some birds still visit the water even on quite cold days – but we haven’t had many of those lately.

Probably the most common visitors would have to be the honeyeater species, including:

  •  Red Wattlebirds,
  • White-plumed honeyeaters,
  • New Holland Honeyeaters,
  • Brown-headed Honeyeaters 
  • Singing Honeyeaters
  • Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters

Other regular visitors include:

  • Australian Magpies
  • White-winged Choughs
  • Grey Currawong
  • Australian Magpie Larks
  • Crested Pigeons
  • Spotted Turtledove
  • Striated Pardalote
  • Spotted Pardalote
  • Silvereyes
  • House Sparrow
  • Common Starling
  • Common Blackbird
White-plumed Honeyeater

White-plumed Honeyeater

Male House Sparrow at our bird bath

Male House Sparrow at our bird bath

 

An unusual sighting of a Chukar Partridge

Last week our neighbour popped in unexpectedly. We hadn’t chatted to her for a while so she was most welcome. She has known for years that I was interested in birds and had really enjoyed an illustrated talk about birds I gave some months ago to the local Senior Citizens group, Interestingly she had a bird field guide in her hand, open to a page showing a photo of a Chukar Partridge.

Her simple question was: ‘Is this bird found around here?’ She had never seen one before and was struggling to understand why she never seen it. She had been taking her dogs for a walk up the hill from our place. This is on the edge of Murray Bridge in South Australia and she was walking along the road through the start of an adjacent farming area.

This species is native to large areas of Eurasia. It has been introduced into Australia and I presume as  game bird. In fact, some years ago some birds were released in the Gulgong area east of Dubbo in NSW. They never became established as a self-sustaining population. As there have been no sightings in recent years it is presumed they are extinct in that area.

So where did the bird seen by my neighbour originate? Interestingly, a year or so ago my cousin, who also lives here in Murray Bridge, sent me a photo of one in his garden.  I can find no reference to this species being kept as an aviary bird though I guess that is one possible explanation if one has escaped. Perhaps someone has kept a few as meat birds and one escaped. Being a member of the pheasant family I guess that they are good eating. It is a wonder it has survived as we have quite a few foxes prowling the area.

I have no answers to these perplexing questions.

You can read more about this species here.