Wildlife of Lane Cove National Park

Noisy Miner

Noisy Miner

Over recent years, my wife and I have visited the Lane Cove National Park just west of Chatswood in the heart of Sydney. We try to get there whenever we visit family living in Artarmon nearby. Despite being in the heart of a bustling part of the city, this park not only preserves some remnant bushland for all to enjoy, it also boasts a good range of wildlife. I am particularly interested in the birdlife – hence this website. I also take an interest in other forms of wildlife, as well as the plant life, an interest which flows over from my wife.

On a visit there last October, I managed a few photos of some of the resident birds, as well as some other wildlife. A few weeks ago I shared a photo of two Long-necked Turtles here. I have also written about the local Sulphur-crested Cockatoos and the Australian Wood Ducks I saw in the park.

One of the very common birds in this area is the Noisy Miner, shown in the photo above. This individual landed on the picnic table alongside where we were sitting. I guess it was looking for a handout of human food, just like the local Laughing Kookaburras and Brush Turkeys. Noisy Miners are certainly the most common of the Australian honeyeaters in this part of Sydney.

Laughing Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra

I have noticed on all of our visits to this park that the Eastern Water Dragon is a very commonly observed reptile in the park. I think that we have seen many of these lizards on every visit to the park. The one shown in the photo below was quite friendly and unafraid, coming up quite close to where we were sitting.

Eastern Water Dragon

Eastern Water Dragon

Further reading:

Laughing Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra

Australian Wood Ducks

Australian Wood Ducks

 

2 Responses to “Wildlife of Lane Cove National Park”

  1. Ken Rolph says:

    Speaking of watering . . . We have a large terracotta bowl that the noisy miners use as a diving pool. We also have on the bird table where we put the seeds a small stainless steel bowl. It is meant for bird cages, but I connected the holding ring to the side of the bird table and we leave it out in the open. It’s about as big as the palm of your hand. I keep finding it pulled out of its ring holder and left in various places on the table. I suspect one of the birds is trying to carry it off, but which I don’t know. The only candidates of suitable size would be the magpies or the ravens. They already give us constant disturbance by trying to carry off the white pebbles from next doors driveway but dropping them mid-flight on our roof or yard.

    I’m trying to think of other things I could leave out for them to filch and make off with, so they leave the water dish alone.

    • Trevor says:

      Hi Ken,
      Another culprit could be Pied Currawongs; they are big enough to lift a bowl of that size. I’m not sure what the bird is trying to achieve. Is it just taking it as a trophy? Does it think it could be a base for a nest? Bowerbirds are known for collecting various manufactured items (eg pegs) to line their bowers in order to attract a mate, but I’ve never heard of a bowl. Ravens and magpies have been known to collect fencing wire to line a nest. various birds are known to treasure golf balls too, carrying them off to their nests.

      As for distracting the bird with items to take, I guess anything shiny might be attractive. Some suggestions: washers, coins (?), small tin cans, foil, nails, screws – though if these last two are dropped in driveways or the road, some tyres may come off feeling let down.

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